VITAL STATS

Austin Metro (1980 – 1990)

Home grown talent shows patriotism and practicality
ALTHOUGH RIVALS CONTEST ITS CLAIM OF BEING THE ‘BRITISH CAR TO BEAT THE WORLD’. BL’S SAVIOUR CAME IN THE NICK OF TIME AND WAS EAGERLY ANTICIPATED FOR AT LEAST A YEAR BEFORE ITS PRESTIGIOUS LAUNCH AT THE BRITISH MOTOR SHOW IN 1980 WITH THE LATE MARGARET THATCHER, PRIME MINISTER IN ATTENDANCE. BILLED AS THE BRITISH CAR TO BEAT THE WORLD AND CHAMPIONED BY LADY DIANA SPENCER.

The Austin Metro became a huge success in Britain with over 1 million sold in its ten year production run, in fact the Metro out sold every other car in the UK throughout the 1980s except for one, the Ford Escort mark III (1980–1986).

Although described as an all new mass production car many of the internal parts of the Metro were actually carried across from BL’s other models, namely the Mini’s 998 cc and 1275 cc A-Series engines, much of the front-wheel drive train, the four-speed gearbox and suspension sub-frames. The Metro also used the Hydragas suspension system found on the Austin Allegro but without front to rear interconnection.

The Metro progressed through the eighties with further options such as the more refined Van den Plas luxury model and the sporty MG Metro, both adding to this hatchback’s success story. By the late eighties the Austin name was removed and the car was known as simply Metro, although badges were still longboat shaped as all Rover badges were, depicting a potential re-launch that came to pass in 1990, with the Metro becoming the Rover Metro together with revisions to the body and an all new K-Series engine.

LOREM IPSUM

  • As with many other British Leyland
  • Cars of the period, a number of “
  • These upgrades were designed by
  • Capacity was also upped to 1998cc

LOREM IPSUM

  • As with many other British Leyland
  • Cars of the period, a number of “
  • These upgrades were designed by
  • Capacity was also upped to 1998cc

LOREM IPSUM

  • As with many other British Leyland
  • Cars of the period, a number of “
  • These upgrades were designed by
  • Capacity was also upped to 1998cc
SPECIFICATION
Years Produced1980 - 1990
Performance0 - 60mph 18.0sec / Top Speed - 88mph
Power & Torque 44bhp / 52Ib ft
Engine998cc / four cylinder / 8 valves
Drive-train Front engine FWD
TransmissionFour speed manual
Weight743kg
VALUATION SINCE LAUNCH
 Launch201020112012201320142015
Concours£4,799£5,000£6,000£8,000£10,000£15,000£18,000
Excellent£3,000£4,000£5,000£6,000£7,000£9,500
Good£1,500£2,000£3,000£4,000£5,000£6,000
Fair£1,000£1,500£2,000£2,500£3,000£3,000
A BUYERS GUIDE
  • British Leyland’s reputation for reliability sadly wasn’t always the best, however the Austin Metro did improve throughout its production history and so early models tend to be less refined than the later ones. When it comes to corrosion the Metro suffered badly like many other cars in the eighties so check in all the usual places such as wings, arches, sills and door bottoms. Fortunately body panels are still widely available.
  • The Metro’s A-Series engine is a reliable, well built and above all tried and tested having been used in the Mini for many years. These 998cc and 1275cc units are capable of high mileage providing they have been properly maintained so check the vehicles history for evidence of this. Similar to the Mini, Metros can suffer in damp weather, however this is usually down to spark plugs and poor maintenance, again a car that has been looked after well should have the relevant history to prove this.
  • Transmission problems are quite common as again this came from the Mini and was never the best design anyway. The Metro can jump out of second gear due to worn synchromesh rings and suffer with clutch judder. Make sure transmission lubricant levels are good and stay that way.
  • The Metro delivers a very respectable ride and handling thanks to its Hydragas suspension as used on the Austin Allegro. This system has proved very reliable with only minor fluid leaks from the pipe connections being a potential problem. The condition inside the car is generally down to the previous owners, although replacement parts are still readily available.
INSURING an Austin Metro

Cars from the 1980s are now well within the realms of classic status which is great news when it comes to insurance. At Heritage Insurance with 50 years experience behind us, we offer a tailor made package for one or more cars. We include both our in house agreed value service and salvage retention should the worst happen at no extra cost, and with limited mileage and club members discounts our annual fully Comprehensive policy proves excellent value for money. Here are some typical examples of how little your insurance could be.

  • This quotation is based on fully comprehensive cover, insured only to drive age 60.

Annual premium – £85.23 with a £100 accidental damage excess.

  • This quotation is based on fully comprehensive cover, insured only to drive age 45.

Annual premium – £89.61 with a £100 accidental damage excess.

  • This quotation is based on fully comprehensive cover, insured only to drive age 30.

Annual premium – £127.62 with a £100 accidental damage excess.

*NB: Insurance quotes based on the following criteria:

  • The vehicle garaged overnight
  • The insurer has no record of accidents, claims or convictions
  • The insurer drives a main car daily and doesn’t exceed a mileage of 3000 per annum.

All quotations based on an Agreed Value of £3,000. Prices may alter depending on individual criteria.

INSURING an Austin Metro

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